Select your language

8100 ingrid Drive, Elgin TX 78621 +1 (512) 772-1972 info@ewcmi.us Sun-Fri 10:00 - 16:00H CST
Open menu

Parashah 36 - Beha'alotekha (When you set up)

Category: Parashah
Read Time: 8 mins
Hits: 1661

Weekly Parashah


Torah: Num. 8:1–12:16 Haftara: Zech. 2:14–4:7  Brith Chadashah: Lk. 17:11–18:14
1 Cor.10:6-13
Rev.11:1-19

Beha'alotekha (When you set up)

Scripture: 

Num. 8:1–12:16

Torah

 

Dedication of the Levites

Adonai spoke to Moses saying, “Speak to Aaron and say to him: When you erect the lamps, the seven lamps are to illuminate the area in front of the menorah.” Aaron did so. He erected the lamps facing forward so they illuminated the area in front of the menorah, just as Adonai had commanded Moses. Now this is how the menorah was made: hammered gold from its base to its blossoms. Just as was the pattern that Adonai had shown to Moses, so he made the menorah.

Again Adonai spoke to Moses saying, “Take the Levites from among Bnei-Yisraeland ceremonially cleanse them. This is what you must do to them to make them clean: Sprinkle the purifying water on them,[a] then have them shave their whole bodies and wash their clothes, thus purifying themselves.

“Then they are to take a young bull with its grain offering of fine flour mixed with oil, plus a second young bull for a sin offering. Bring the Levites before the Tent of Meeting, and gather the whole community of Bnei-Yisrael10 Bring the Levites before AdonaiBnei-Yisrael will lay their hands on the Levites, 11 and Aaron will present the Levites before Adonai as a wave offering from Bnei-Yisrael. Then they may go about the work of the service of Adonai.

 https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Num.+8%3A1%E2%80%9312%3A16&version=TLV

Scripture: 

 Zech. 2:14–4:7

Haftarah

14 “‘Sing and rejoice, O daughter of Zion! For behold, I am coming and I will live among you’[a]—it is a declaration of Adonai15 ‘In that day many nations will join themselves to Adonai and they will be My people and I will dwell among you.’ Then you will know that Adonai-Tzva’ot has sent me to you. 16 Adonai will inherit Judah as His portion in the holy land and will once again choose Jerusalem. 17 Be silent before Adonai, all flesh, for He has aroused Himself from His holy dwelling.”

Joshua the Kohen Gadol

3 Then he showed me Joshua the kohen gadol standing before the angel of Adonai and the satan[b], standing at his right hand to accuse him. [cAdonai said to the satan, ‘Adonai rebukes you, the satan. Indeed Adonai, who has chosen Jerusalem, rebukes you.[d] Is not this man a brand plucked out of the fire?’

Now Joshua was wearing filthy garments and standing before the angel who answered and spoke to those standing before him saying, ‘Remove the filthy garments from him.’ Then to Joshua he said, ‘See, I have removed your iniquity from you and will dress you with fine clothing.’[e]

Then I said, ‘Place a clean turban on his head.’

So they put a pure turban on his head and clothed him with garments while the angel of Adonai stood by.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Zech.+2%3A14%E2%80%934%3A7&version=TLV

 

 

Scripture: 

Lk. 17:11–18:14
1 Cor.10:6-13
Rev.11:1-19

Brit Chadashah

 

On the Move through Samaria

11 Now while going up to Jerusalem, Yeshua was passing between Samaria and the Galilee. 12 As He entered a certain village, ten men with tzara’at came toward Him. They stood some distance away [a13 and raised their voices, saying, “Yeshua, Master, have mercy on us!”

14 When He saw them, He said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the kohanim.”[b] And as they went, they were cleansed. 15 Now one of them, when he saw that he was healed, came back, glorifying God with a loud voice. 16 And he fell at Yeshua’s feet, facedown, giving Him thanks. And he was a Samaritan.

17 Then Yeshua answered and said, “Weren’t ten cleansed? But where are the nine? 18 Weren’t any found who came back to give glory to God except this foreigner?” 19 Then Yeshua said to the man, “Stand up and go! Your faith has made you well.”

20 Now when Yeshua was asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, He answered them and said, “The kingdom of God does not come with signs to be seen. 21 Nor will they say, ‘Look, here!’ or ‘There!’ For behold, the kingdom of God is in your midst.”

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Lk.+17%3A11%E2%80%9318%3A14&version=TLV

1 Corinthians 10 : 6 – 13

Now these things happened as examples for us, so we wouldn’t crave evil things, just as they did. [aDo not be idolaters, as some of them were. As it is written, “The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.” [bAnd let’s not commit sexual immorality, as some of them did—and in one day 23,000 fell. [c]And let’s not test the Lord, as some of them did—and were destroyed by serpents. [d10 And let’s not grumble, as some of them did—and were destroyed by the destroying angel. [e11 Now these things happened to them as an example, and it was written down as a warning to us—on whom the ends of the ages have come. 12 Therefore let the one who thinks that he stands watch out that he doesn’t fall. 13 No temptation has taken hold of you except what is common to mankind. But God is faithful—He will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you can handle. But with the temptation He will also provide a way of escape, so you will be able to endure it.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+Cor.10%3A6-13+&version=TLV

Revelation 11 : 1 – 19

Two Witnesses

11 Then a measuring rod like a staff was given to me, saying, “Get up and measure the Temple of God and the altar, and count those worshiping in it. [aBut do not measure the court outside the Temple—leave it out, because it has been given to the nations, and they shall trample the holy city for forty-two months. [b]And I will grant authority to My two witnesses and they will prophesy for 1,260 days,[c] dressed in sackcloth.”

These are the two olive trees and the two menorot that are standing before the Lord of the earth. [dIf anyone wishes to harm them, fire comes out of their mouths and consumes their enemies. If anyone wants to harm them, he must be killed in this way. [eThese two have the power to shut the heavens, so that no rain may fall during the days of their prophesying.[f] And they have power over the waters to turn them into blood, and to strike the earth with every kind of plague as often as they wish.[g]

When they have finished their testimony, the beast that rises from the abyss will make war on them, and overcome them and kill them. [hAnd their corpses will lie in the open street[i] of the great city that figuratively is called Sodom and Egypt—where also their[j] Lord was crucified. Some from the peoples and tribes and tongues and nations will look at their corpses for three and a half days, not allowing them to be placed into a grave. [k10 Those who dwell on the earth will rejoice over them. They will celebrate and send gifts to one another, because these two prophets tormented those who dwell on the earth.

https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Rev.11%3A1-19&version=TLV

 

Parashah in 60 seconds

Webmaster

 

 

Music Styles Black Gospel

Category: Radio
Read Time: 9 mins
Hits: 10232

Styles

On this radio station you will find the following music styles;
excerpts and links to wikipedia

Gospel (black gospel as not southern gospel)

Gospel music is a music genre in Christian music. The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of gospel music varies according to culture and social context. Gospel music is composed and performed for many purposes, including aesthetic pleasure, religious or ceremonial purposes, and as an entertainment product for the marketplace. Gospel music usually has dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) with Christian lyrics. Gospel music can be traced to the early 17th century,[1] with roots in the black oral tradition. Hymns and sacred songs were repeated in a call and response fashion. Most of the churches relied on hand clapping and foot stomping as rhythmic accompaniment. Most of the singing was done a cappella.[2] The first published use of the term ″Gospel Song" probably appeared in 1874. The original gospel songs were written and composed by authors such as George F. Root, Philip Bliss, Charles H. Gabriel, William Howard Doane, and Fanny Crosby.[3] Gospel music publishing houses emerged. The advent of radio in the 1920s greatly increased the audience for gospel music. Following World War II, gospel music moved into major auditoriums, and gospel music concerts became quite elaborate.[4]

Gospel blues is a blues-based form of gospel music (a combination of blues guitar and evangelistic lyrics). 

Style

Gospel music in general is characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a Christian nature. Subgenres include contemporary gospel, urban contemporary gospel (sometimes referred to as "black gospel"). Several forms of gospel music utilize choirs, use piano or Hammond organ, tambourines, drums, bass guitar and, increasingly, electric guitar. In comparison with hymns, which are generally of a statelier measure, the gospel song is expected to have a refrain and often a more syncopated rhythm.

Several attempts have been made to describe the style of late 19th and early 20th century gospel songs in general. Christ-Janer said "the music was tuneful and easy to grasp ... rudimentary harmonies ... use of the chorus ... varied metric schemes ... motor rhythms were characteristic ... The device of letting the lower parts echo rhythmically a motive announced by the sopranos became a mannerism".[5]

Roots and background

Coming out of the African American religious experience, gospel music can be traced to the early 17th century.[1] Gospel music has roots in the black oral tradition, and typically utilizes a great deal of repetition. The repetition of the words allowed those who could not read the opportunity to participate in worship. During this time, hymns and sacred songs were lined and repeated in a call and response fashion, and the Negro spirituals and work songs emerged. Repetition and "call and response" are accepted elements in African music, designed to achieve an altered state of consciousness we sometimes refer to as "trance", and strengthen communal bonds.

Most of the churches relied on hand clapping and foot stomping as rhythmic accompaniment. There would be guitars and tambourines available every now and then, but not frequently. Church choirs became a norm only after emancipation. Most of the singing was done a cappella.[2]

20th century

The holiness-Pentecostal movement, or sanctified movement, appealed to people who were not attuned to the Europeanized version of black church music. Holiness worship has used any type of instrumentation that congregation members might bring in, from tambourines to electric guitars. Pentecostal churches readily adopted and contributed to the gospel music publications of the early 20th century. Late 20th-century musicians such as Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Mahalia Jackson, Andrae Crouch, and the Blackwood Brothers either were raised in a Pentecostal environment, or have acknowledged the influence of that tradition.[11]

The advent of radio in the 1920s greatly increased the audience for gospel music, and James D. Vaughan used radio as an integral part of his business model, which also included traveling quartets to publicize the gospel music books he published several times a year.[12] Virgil O. Stamps and Jesse R. Baxter studied Vaughan's business model and by the late 1920s were running heavy competition for Vaughan.[11] The 1920s also saw the marketing of gospel records by groups such as the Carter Family.

The first person to introduce the ragtime influence to gospel accompaniment as well as to play the piano on a gospel recording was Arizona Dranes.[13]

In African-American music, gospel quartets developed an a cappella style following the earlier success of the Fisk Jubilee Singers. The 1930s saw the Fairfield Four, the Dixie Hummingbirds, the Five Blind Boys of Mississippi, the Five Blind Boys of Alabama, The Soul Stirrers, the Swan Silvertones, the Charioteers, and the Golden Gate Quartet. Racism divided the nation, and this division did not skip the church. If during slavery blacks were treated as inferior inside the white churches, after emancipation they formed their own separate churches. The gospel groups which were very popular within the black community, were virtually unknown to the white community, though some in the white community began to follow them.[14] In addition to these high-profile quartets, there were many black gospel musicians performing in the 1920s and 30s, usually playing the guitar and singing in the streets of Southern cities. Famous among them were Blind Willie Johnson, Blind Joe Taggart and others.

In the 1930s, in Chicago, Thomas A. Dorsey (best known as author of the song "Precious Lord, Take My Hand"), who had spent the 1920s writing and performong secular blues music under the name "Georgia Tom", turned to gospel music, establishing a publishing house.[4] He had experienced many trials in his life,including the death of his pregnant wife. Thomas gained biblical knowledge from his father, who was a Baptist minister, and was taught to play piano by his mother. He started working with blues musicians when the family moved to Atlanta.[15] It has been said that 1930 was the year when modern gospel music began, because the National Baptist Convention first publicly endorsed the music at its 1930 meeting.[16] Dorsey was responsible for developing the musical careers of many African-American artists, such as Mahalia Jackson.[4]

Meanwhile, the radio continued to develop an audience for gospel music, a fact that was commemorated in Albert E. Brumley's 1937 song, "Turn Your Radio On" (which is still being published in gospel song books). In 1972, a recording of "Turn Your Radio On" by the Lewis Family was nominated for "Gospel Song of the Year" in the Gospel Music Association's Dove Awards.[17]

Following the Second World War, gospel music moved into major auditoriums, and gospel music concerts became quite elaborate.[4] In 1950, black gospel was featured at Carnegie Hall when Joe Bostic produced the Negro Gospel and Religious Music Festival. He repeated it the next year with an expanded list of performing artists, and in 1959 moved to Madison Square Garden.[18] Today, black gospel and white gospel are distinct genres, with distinct audiences.

Style

The secular version of this music is urban contemporary music, which is musically indistinguishable, but which takes non-religious subjects for its lyrical content.

Urban/contemporary gospel music is characterized by dominant vocals, usually performed by a soloist. Common instruments include drums, electric guitar, bass guitar, and keyboards.
The lyrics very often have an explicitly Christian nature, although "inspirational" songs feature lyrics that can be construed as secular in meaning. For example, a song about a father's love for his son may be interpreted as God the Father's love for God the Son, or as a human father's love for his human child. This lyrical ambiguity echoes the double-voicedness of 19th century spirituals, and may have musical crossover appeal to the larger secular market (Darden 2004:79-80). Common themes include hope, deliverance, love, and healing (Waldron 2006).

In comparison with traditional hymns, which are generally of a statelier measure, gospel songs are expected to have a refrain and a pronounced beat with a syncopated rhythm. Compared to modern praise and worship music, urban/contemporary gospel typically has a faster tempo and more emphasis on the performer. Like traditional black gospel music, the performer's emotional connection to the audience and the lyrical content of the song is valued highly.

The genre includes Christian hip hop (sometimes called "Christian rap"), Which is described in a separate link on this site.
 

 

Webmaster

Index of Artists

Index of Artists

The Amazon Links provided are Affiliate Links and will provide us with a little money supporting this ministry.


Privacy Policy

GDPR Privacy Policy

(c) EWCMI 2009-2023 Terms of Use
All Donations, Seeds, and Tithes to Eagle Wings Charismatic Ministries International are tax deductible per the Internal Revenue Code 501(c)(3) Public Charity Status 170(b)(1)(A)(i) DLN 17053243329039
  Site Seal

Login